Northanger Abbey: The Forgotten Jane Austen?

Most of the time, when people mention Jane Austen, they immediately think of Pride and Prejudice or Sense & Sensibility. True diehards will mention Emma and Persuasion. Mansfield Park occasionally creeps into the discussion.

Personally, I enjoyed Northanger Abbey much more than Persuasion and Mansfield Park. But, in my experience, very few people ever bring up Northanger Abbey.

Why is that?

Perhaps it’s because Northanger Abbey was the first book that Jane Austen wrote but the last one published, her style of writing clearly had evolved over the years as well as her ability to dissect human behavior within the social structure within Regency era upper class.

Or perhaps it’s because Northanger Abbey has a very different storyline. Jane Austen seemed to be making a satirical commentary on the Gothic novels that were popular at the turn of the century. Despite the satire, Jane Austen’s first novel is a love story that, in many ways, is the most believable and true-to-life of all her novels.

Consider both John Thorpe and Henry Tilney, the former who is rather forward in his affections toward Catherine while the latter is much more restrained, leaving Catherine Morland wondering whether or not he does care for her as more than friend. Underlying the romance is John Thorpe’s quest to better himself—he thinks Catherine will inherit money—and Henry Tilney who has money but is rather understated about it.

I don’t know about you but, in my life, far too often I encounter fortune seekers, people who look for quick “Get Rich” schemes or try to rise to fame and fortune by taking short cuts. In some circles, especially with the younger generation, it’s expected that they will be rich and, when forced to work for it, they baulk…

To read more from this post, hop on over to Austen Authors!


First time visiting me? Subscribe for email updates or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram.

Leave a Reply